Second Hand Munich

Second hand shopping in Munich

At first glance, Munich does not seem like a land of plenty for second hand shopping. Especially if you come from London, where whole high streets are dedicated to the second chance market. But once you know your way around, there is at least an entire afternoon’s worth of rummaging and haggling to be had, albeit with a bit of travelling between stops.

First and foremost are the two main branches of Weisser Rabe (http://www.weisser-rabe.de/). I furnished my entire flat for under €200 at Weisser Rabe (+ some heirlooms); including a beautiful 1920s (guess) mahogany writing chest, they were practically giving away. More commonly you will find plenty of modern furniture, and if you like a seventies look, then on a lucky day they have some pretty stylish bits. I have seen pretty attractive three piece suites, tables and cabinets that if you have a modern flat could really create (or re-create) a style.

And then there’s the chinaware. As I write this, I can glance up to admire a tea set we picked up of under €10: Six white cups and kaki green saucers, a milk jug and pot, all with orange flowers on the side. Perhaps not to everybody’s taste, but in mint condition and I like it. Weisser Rabe also has clothes books and records to browse through, though the selection of clothes is perhaps not so good.

Next up in my favourites is Sputnik (www.sputnik-muenchen.de). A flohmarkt at the top of its game, this sizable store out in Nymphenburg is well worth a visit. As the name would suggest, it makes considerable efforts to bring a stylish look and presentation to second hand, and is particularly good for its collection of old wind up watches (I got one I am very pleased with for €25) and jewellery. There is also a gallery upstairs as well.

After this, back towards town you will find http://www.flohpalast.de/. A much less assuming place, but often with some good stuff inside. I picked up a beautiful art deco handbag for my girlfriend in there, made by the now defunct brand ‘Adolf’. She was delighted with it, until she spotted the logo.

There are quite a few vintage clothing stores to be found around Schwarbing as well; though some of them do cater for expensive tastes. There is also now an Oxfam on Turkenstr., kitted out exactly like an English Oxfam, but not with a great range, the times I have visited.

 

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